Pittwater Life

Diets and weight loss: separating facts from fiction

Diets and weight loss: separating facts from fiction
Rosemary Stanton – Nutritionist, UNSW Australia

There is good evidence to show genes play a role in obesity and explain why some people gain more weight than others when their energy intake exceeds their body’s needs. But genetic factors can’t explain the rapid increase in excess body fat over the past 20 to 30 years.

So what has changed? Two obvious factors stand out.

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Why kids can benefit from being outside

Why kids can benefit from being outside
Shelby Gull Laird | Laura McFarland

The majority of children spend more than the recommended maximum of two hours per day involved in “screen time”. In a 2009 study, researchers found that over half of the Australian children studied between the ages of ten to 12 spent less than 1 hour outside each day.

But there are plenty of physical and mental benefits to outdoor time for children. Here are just a few reasons to get outside this summer.

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Overworked? Good habits, not holidays, are the answer

Overworked? Good habits, not holidays, are the answer
Stacey Parker - University Of Queensland

Australians work very long hours compared to workers in other developed countries. But evidence shows that employees who work more than 48 hours per week, or are overcommitted or over-invested in their work tend to have have poorer cardiovascular health than other workers.

In fact, long work hours increase risk of dying from cardiovascular heart disease, risk to family functioning, injury at work, smoking intensity, anxiety, digestive problems, and alcohol abuse.

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2016 The Year That Was - Art and Culture

2016 The Year That Was - Art and Culture
Suzy Freeman-Greene - The Conversation

2016 was not a good year to be a famous male musician. In January, David Bowie died at just 69. He was mourned by pretty much everyone, including the German Foreign Office, which tweeted: “You are now among Heroes”.

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Australia’s climate in 2016 - a year of two halves as El Niño unwound

Australia’s climate in 2016 - a year of two halves as El Niño unwound
Blair Trewin - Climate scientist, Australian Bureau of Meteorology

For Australia’s climate, 2016 was a year of two halves. The year started with one of the strongest El Niño events on record in place in the Pacific Ocean, and the opening months of 2016 were generally hot and dry, especially in northern and eastern Australia.

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Enough Is enough - Buying more stuff isn’t always the answer to happiness

Enough Is enough - Buying more stuff isn’t always the answer to happiness
Greg Foyster - Lecturer, Swinburne University

We’re “bursting”, with the amount of stuff that we have - while all of this consumption is steeping us in debt and dangerously depleting the planet’s resources and systems. So after Christmas, and the Boxing Day sales, it seems like a good time to ask: what is the purpose of all this consumption?

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Tick-induced allergy - a growing problem

Tick-induced allergy - a growing problem
Julie Cross - Manly Daily

Dr Stephen Ginsborg was quoted to say people  on the northern beaches should be more concerned about ticks than sharks,
“If you live on the northern beaches you are more likely to get a tick bite with dangerous consequences than you are to have a mishap with a shark,”.

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The Science is In - gardening is good for you

The Science is In - gardening is good for you
Chris Williams | The Conversation

As the weather warms and days lengthen, your attention may be turning to that forgotten patch of your backyard. This week we’ve asked our experts to share the science behind gardening. So grab a trowel and your green thumbs, and dig in.

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