Pittwater Life

Farewell John Clarke: in an absurd world, we have never needed you more

Farewell John Clarke: in an absurd world, we have never needed you more
Robert Phiddian|Deputy Dean, School of Humanities, Flinders University

John Clarke, who died suddenly at the weekend, called out absurd politicking and dishonest language wherever he found it.

It cannot be the final arkle! Surely the inventor of Dave Sorenson, greatest and most persistently injured of farnarklers, will rebuild himself for the next match. Please tell me this is only the umlaut, and John Clarke will be back for the second half. In our more than usually absurd world, we have never needed him more.

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Three rivers are now legally people – with legal rights.

Three rivers are now legally people – with legal rights.
Erin O'Donnell & Julia Talbot-Jones

In the space of a week, the world has gained three notable new legal persons.

In New Zealand, the government passed legislation that recognised the Whanganui River catchment as a legal person. In India, the Uttarakhand high court ruled that the Ganga and Yamuna Rivers have the same legal rights as a person, in response to the urgent need to reduce pollution in two rivers considered sacred in the Hindu religion.

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Designed For Movement

Designed For Movement
Andy Derijk

The human body is designed for movement, over the years our labour saving devices have cost us dearly by making us move significantly less… Sitting for hours on end (and hours on our end!) has now been described by many experts as the new Health risk compared to smoking!

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Diets and weight loss: separating facts from fiction

Diets and weight loss: separating facts from fiction
Rosemary Stanton – Nutritionist, UNSW Australia

There is good evidence to show genes play a role in obesity and explain why some people gain more weight than others when their energy intake exceeds their body’s needs. But genetic factors can’t explain the rapid increase in excess body fat over the past 20 to 30 years.

So what has changed? Two obvious factors stand out.

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Why kids can benefit from being outside

Why kids can benefit from being outside
Shelby Gull Laird | Laura McFarland

The majority of children spend more than the recommended maximum of two hours per day involved in “screen time”. In a 2009 study, researchers found that over half of the Australian children studied between the ages of ten to 12 spent less than 1 hour outside each day.

But there are plenty of physical and mental benefits to outdoor time for children. Here are just a few reasons to get outside this summer.

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Overworked? Good habits, not holidays, are the answer

Overworked? Good habits, not holidays, are the answer
Stacey Parker - University Of Queensland

Australians work very long hours compared to workers in other developed countries. But evidence shows that employees who work more than 48 hours per week, or are overcommitted or over-invested in their work tend to have have poorer cardiovascular health than other workers.

In fact, long work hours increase risk of dying from cardiovascular heart disease, risk to family functioning, injury at work, smoking intensity, anxiety, digestive problems, and alcohol abuse.

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2016 The Year That Was - Art and Culture

2016 The Year That Was - Art and Culture
Suzy Freeman-Greene - The Conversation

2016 was not a good year to be a famous male musician. In January, David Bowie died at just 69. He was mourned by pretty much everyone, including the German Foreign Office, which tweeted: “You are now among Heroes”.

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